News, Analysis and Opinion for the Informed Boulder Resident
Friday November 27th 2015

Support the Blue Line

Subscribe to the Blue Line

That's what she said

city council transportation energy municipalization xcel housing urban planning bicycles april fools election 2011 density climate action boulder county open space renewables agriculture affordable housing CU local food election 2013 jefferson parkway youth election 2015 development pedestrian preservation climate change Rocky Flats BVSD immigration mountain bikes recreation GMOs farming decarbonization fracking fires colorado politics transit downtown architecture smart regs new era colorado boards and commissions plutonium urban design plan boulder transit village journalism wildlife natural gas commuting homeless radioactive waste parking height limits rental planning board april fools 2015 Neighborhoods energy efficiency ghgs North Boulder gardens education arts historic district coal election 2010 water supply students land use taxes diversity University Hill election 2012 historic preservation bike lane walkability solar population growth water quality zoning RTD library zero waste mayor planning reserve groundwater bus affairs of the heart organic politics longmont hazardous waste electric utility obama right-sizing transportation master plan golden flood PV climate smart loan sprawl election recycling solar panels nutrition colorado legislature diagonal plaza Mapleton conservation easement food epa boulder junction congestion pesticide road diet drought growth community cycles ballot safety county commissioners bus rapid transit hogan-pancost children wetlands campaign finance Newlands ecocycle electric vehicle comprehensive plan daily camera ken wilson community PUC sam weaver wind power league of women voters climate change deniers david miller jane jacobs modernism kevin hotaling lisa morzel monsanto tim plass suzanne jones gun safety mining john tayer walmart gun control germany climate oil portland civil rights boulder Whittier bears arizona Orchard Grove green points EV marijuana public spaces bsec bob bellemare contamination boulder creek west tsa mlk crime

Boulder Gives Birth to Senate Bill on Mobile Home Dwellers’ Rights


Mobile Home parks – have you thought about who lives in them?  Have you considered what contribution they make to low income housing in Boulder and beyond?   Have stereotypes blocked much thought about them?  The answer for the City of Boulder is yes – we have thought about them and we are willing to bust through stereotypes and take action. Boulder has spearheaded an effort to update the antiquated and feudal situation in mobile home parks in Colorado and to balance more equitably the rights of mobile home owners and owners of mobile home parks.   Why is this important?  Well, because mobile homes are not mobile despite their name. Most never move more than once from factory to site and the ownership and equity then become critical with a privately owned home on top of separately owned land.

Thanks to the insight and encouragement of Boulder’s City Council, Colorado Senate Bill SB 10-156, to enhance the rights of mobile home owners and dwellers, is before the Senate Judiciary committee.  The hard work and determination of residents of Orchard Grove Mobile Home Park in Boulder to survive as a mobile home park and to make the city aware of the value of mobile homes as a form of affordable housing for low income residents brought to light the need to update the legislation of mobile home parks in Colorado.  The City of Boulder helped move this forward by linking Orchard Grove residents with State Senator Rollie Heath & State Rep. Dickie Lee Hullinghorst who have now introduced SB 10-156  in the Colorado legislature.

This will be a step forward for Colorado, but before we get too self congratulatory it is important to remember that many states are way ahead of us.  It is critical to pass SB 10-156 and there is much further to go if we want to meet the standards set forward by other states.   Richard C. Williams, Socio-economist/Faculty of Regis University and resident of Orchard Grove notes that, “Over thirty states have stronger provisions to protect the ownership rights of mobile home residents than does Colorado’s old and outdated law.” His nationwide research shows stronger provisions in many states including the following:

  • 21 states require an eviction notice of 90 days or more for any reasons other than chronic nonpayment of rent.  A few states require the landlord to pay relocation costs in all cases, including non-payment of pad rent, if the resident owns their mobile home.
  • 12 states require the landlord to compensate the home owner for the value of the home if the tenancy is terminated due to a change in use and the tenant is unable to move the home.
  • 15 states require a full year’s notice period to home owners if there is intent to change use.
  • More than 30 states allow regular inspection and regulation of private utilities in mobile home parks, usually through county and/or city access.

It is a bit heart rending to realize that Senate Bill 10-156 includes things that are basic rights for most Colorado residents:  the right to consistent delivery of utilities and water and the right to gather in open spaces in the park.  A future bill to build upon SB 10-156 could include:  1) limits on pad rents (which is not the same as ordinary rent control), a provision that more than 30 other states have in their current laws.  This provision would address the “conflict of ownership” issue that is similar to that of condo ownership on rented land; and 2) it could meet the nationwide tend towards resident owned trailer parks.   Seventeen states have specific laws providing residents with an “opportunity to buy” their mobile home park if the landlord decides to put the park up for sale.

Kudos to Boulder for bringing the issue of mobile home owners rights forward.  Let’s get this bill into law and then set about strengthening the situation for low income residents of Colorado who live in mobile home across the state.

To read the bill go to and then click on “State and Federal Legislative Matters” on the left hand side of the page.

To support the bill call your State Senator and ask her/him to support it.  Better yet call all the members for the Colorado Senate and tell them you support this bill and ask them to vote for it.

Rate this article: 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

What do you think? Leave a comment!

You must be logged in to post a comment.